Being Reasonable: Plain talk for living in the future

Now in its Second Edition

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View the Table of Contents and download free chapters of the book here.

View reviews and comments here.

Read Ross Urquhart's writings in the Georgia Straight here.

Ross has written a collection of short history stories titled West Side Stories based on his interviews with the pioneers of the Lytton-Stein Valley area. It is available here.

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Do you know what freedom is? How about democracy? What are good and evil and where did they originate?

These sound like simple, basic questions – until you try and explain them to someone. Do you think you're a racist? You might have to think again after reading the chapter.

How about the meaning of life, did you know that after hundreds of millennia staying the same, it's now changing?

Is there a middle ground between atheists and believers – does either argument make sense?

Is war necessary?

What are the real differences between capitalism and socialism, or free trade and free enterprise?

Do you make your own decisions or are you programmed by genetic and environmental factors?

What are the big hurdles we must jump to survive our future – and I don't mean distant future?

Can we depend on those in power to make the right decisions for us? If not – why?

Bringing about change means first knowing the problems we face. Each chapter takes on a so-called well understood belief and tries to break through a fog of strange ideas and accumulated misinformation surrounding it. Once accomplished, you may discover that a large portion of the complexity we face every day is little more than a product of our cultural conditioning.

We have been taught to fear differing views of what is important to us. Are you confident enough in your beliefs to examine other alternatives?

Try a few free chapters and decide for yourself if it's worthwhile. You might find that understanding is power in a world where misunderstanding is virtually a requirement.